FAI Hip Impingement (Femoro-acetabular Impingement)

FAI Hip Impingement Awareness facts - It is estimated that approximately 15% of the young, adult population have hip impingement, so who do you know that might have it?
Hip impingement causes painful labral tears within the hip socket.
Hip FAI symptoms are misleading to the average medical professional, as FAI hip impingement pain frequently presents as low back pain and interesting only 10% of back pain is ever clinically diagnosed and cured... Which begs the question what percentage is actually caused by hip FAI or hip impingement, as its otherwise known.
The more active you are, the more likely you are to trigger hip impingement symptoms, so busy mums and gym bunnies beware... but at least you're in good company as many premiere league football players have also suffered FAI hip pain.
Hip impingement is diagnosed through x-ray and labral tears are diagnosed through MRI arthograms - but both need to be read by hip consultants specifically trained in FAI hip impingement.
There are 60,000 hip replacements every year in the UK and it now appears that FAI hip impingement, over the years, could be the leading cause of hip osteoarthritis. A silent epidemic.
Hip arthroscopy can reduce the hip impingement and reattach the torn labrum to the hip socket. This surgery can eliminate the pain and disability caused by FAI hip impingement and divert the need for hip replacement in later life.


Also please feel welcome to join in our help and advice forum for support. We have 3 advising FAI expert hip surgeons, 3 PT/physios and a sports medicine doctor as well as the largest international FAI hip impingement forum on the net:

Tuesday, 21 July 2009

Hip Arthroscopy rehab- day 11

Surgery notes arrived!

Diagnosis: pincer abnormality with labral tear of right hip and wave sign of acetabular cartilage.
Procedure: Arthroscopy of right hip.

Installation of traction and use of image intensifier to assess adequate traction of the hip.
Normal distraction.(able to dislocate hip)

CENTRAL COMPARTMENT:
Installation of anterolateral and anterior portal.(cut me open x2 front thigh)
ACETABULUM - A large wave sign of the acetabular cartilage was noted between 12 and 3 o clock. (think sign arthritis) Acetabular rim trimming performed.Black and decker away some hip socket)
LIGAMENTUM TERES - Found to be normal.
FREMORAL HEAD - A kissing lesion noted due to pincer abnormality.(hip hits leg when flexed - ouch!)
LABRUM - A labral tear was noted, which was repaired with 2 bioraptor suture anchors.(spot of sewing)

PERIPHERAL COMPARTMENT:
Release of traction and installation of anterior and anterolateral portals. Systematic inspection of the peripheral compartment. A cam deformity was noted, which was decompressed.(surprise boney lump on thigh bone, power tools back out again!)

POST OPERATIVE:
Crutches for 4 weeks partial weight bearing.(bloody inconvenient)
Removal sutures one week
Anti-inflammatories.(Burn the crap out of your stomach)

So thats what they did... pass me a bucket!!!!!!

Ps Pain up and down. Surviving. Appointment with Proff Schilders in 3 days. Phone consultation with him today assures me feeling pain is normal after suffering for six years and advises I resume medications (went off anti inflammatories again as even with PPI's still setting my stomach on fire!)

3 comments:

  1. I just had fai surgery done on July 17. I also had a bone spur on my femur with labrum tears. During surgery my doctor also had to release my illiopsoas tendon because it was rubbing on the head of my femur which explains the clicking on certain movements. Leading up to surgery I was not in too much pain because I avoided all activities which caused the pain and I didn't want to damage the cartilage any more than I already did.

    I have been crutch walking since the first day and today I noticed a little more pain than I have, but I just took advil because the prescribed antiinflammatories also upset my stomach. Hang in there! My attitute is even though it seems like a long recovery it's important to think about the amount of time it took to diagnose the problem. If the recovery takes 4 months in the whole scheme of things that is not very long.

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  2. That is true... Have you a blog I can check out? Where are you? Glad you're doing ok.. please do keep me posted.

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  3. I was hoping to see an update from you today :). I haven't seen my surgery report but may ask for a copy once I go in for my next pre-op. How is the pain level this week ? I know the meds can mess with your stomach but if you go to a health food store you can find some licorice and marshmallow root, those are both extremely gentle and will help with any tummy things too.

    Erin
    http://platterpussfai.blogspot.com/

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